Montessori Moveable Alphabet Pictures

Moveable Alphabet Pictures

Every classroom needs a Moveable Alphabet and Moveable Alphabet Pictures. Once a child has mastered the ability to write or make 3 letter phonetic words (mom, pot, can, zip), it can sometimes be a struggle to successfully make phonetic words that are longer than 3 letters. It can take months of work using the Moveable Alphabet (or other similar materials) for a child to be able to ‘hear’ and replicate all the sounds of longer words.
Wooden Moveable AlphabetMontessori Moveable AlphabetPrintable Paper Moveable Alphabetprintable Montessori Moveable Alphabet by Montessori Print Shop
To help the children practice hearing the sounds in longer words, Montessori teachers use a variety of sound games. These can include “I Spy”, clapping words, and games that use manipulation of small objects. In order to allow the child to continue building/constructing longer words independently, Montessori teachers typically use small objects or photo picture cards to make sure the child is constructing words that contain the sounds that the child is familiar with. The goal, as always, is to set the child up for success!

Download a free copy of our “I Spy Game”Free printable I Spy Game

Photos for Movable Alphabet – Step 2Montessori Moveable Alphabet Picture Cards Step 2A large selection of 4+ letter phonetic words.

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The Montessori Silence Game

The Montessori Silence Game

The Montessori Silence Game really is a gem! The children enjoy the peaceful nature of the game and love to try to improve on their previous attempts. But the Silence Game takes a lot of preparation – it’s generally not a game that you play until the classroom has normalized.

In order to prepare for this game you need to take time each day to speak with the children quietly. You need to bring the idea of ‘quiet’ to their consciousness and then give them an opportunity to become quiet.  If they respond in a loud voice, simply make your voice quieter. Keep making your voice quieter until the light bulb goes off and the child has that ‘aha’ moment.  You must show them how to be still and listen to the silence.

You must also allow them to gain an internal understanding of how their own movements and their own voice can make or break the silence. It is only then that they will  learn to control their movements and…Read More

Work is a positive thing for children!

Work is a positive thing for children!

Those who are not familiar with the Montessori method will most often associate the word ‘work’ with a tiring, boring, monotonous duty that one must engage in, in order to keep up with daily living or earn money. In fact, most will also attempt to organize their work schedule to have regular holidays in order to avoid, get away, or take a break from work.

As adults, work is most often thought of in a negative way. In a child’s eyes, work is about energy: learning, engaging, strengthening, overcoming obstacles, becoming independent, and achieving self discipline. When children are young we can see how they deeply desire to learn to talk, walk, feed themselves, dress themselves, clean themselves, and eventually they want to do all the things we consider household ‘chores’. child_cleaningA child’s work is all about creating himself, learning independence and achieving self discipline.  A Montessori environment is specifically set up to answer the call of the children; “Help me to do it myself“.

All of the materials and the general principles in a Montessori environment are indeed ‘work’ for the children, but are full of positive energy that bring about happy, positive, peaceful and self disciplined children.

Does a stroller turn children in to “fine fruit”?

Does a stroller turn children in to “fine fruit”?

In our fast paced world, every day often feels likes a marathon, especially if you have children! We’re pressed for time as our responsibilities have broadened over the years. Many households have 2 parents who work outside of the home, or 1 who works outside the home while the other works inside the home caring for the children, the house and running a small business. Add education, sports, social commitments, family commitments, and  we’re seriously pressed for time!

Often times we rush our very young children through the important and pleasurable act of walking, because we’re so busy running from one stop to the next in an attempt to reach the last destination on our “To-Do List”.  Plain and simple – it’s easier and faster for the adult (and sometimes safer for the child) to plunk them in stroller and be on our way. We are sometimes even perplexed at their frustration of being chauffeured around … what we’d give for a nice comfy ride through the mall!

Maria Montessori has written many books that discuss the subject of allowing children to be in control of their own physical body and locomotion. She believed it’s the adult who must learn to adapt themselves and the environment to the needs of the child and not the other way around.

“The child does not develop the power to walk upright by waiting for it, but by walking. The first step, greeted with such joy by his family, is indeed a conquest of nature, and almost the birth of active man, in place of inert, helpless man, and for the child a new life begins.  In physiology, the emergence of this new function is one of the main tests of normal development. But afterwards, it is practice that counts. The achievement of balance and sure footing is the result of long practice and hence of individual effort. We know that the child starts walking with an irresistible impetus and courage. He is bold, even rash; he is a soldier who hurls himself to victory regardless of the risk. And for this reason the adult surrounds him with protective restrictions, which are so many obstacles; he is enclosed within a play-pen, or strapped in a perambulator, in which he will make his outings even when his legs are already sturdy.”


“This happens because a child’s step is much shorter than that of grown-up, and he has less staying-power for long walks. And the grown-up will not give up his own pace. Even when the grown-up is a nurse – that is to say, someone who has specialised and given herself up to a child’s sole care – it is the child who must adapt himself to the ways of the nurse, not the nurse to him. The nurse will go her own pace, pushing the perambulator in which the child sits like some fine fruit being driven to market. And only when the nurse has reached the place for which she is aiming, perhaps a pleasant park, will she sit down, and let the child get out to play under her watchful eye. In all this, only the child’s body is considered, his “vegetative” life, which must be shielded from any possible danger, but no account is taken of the essential and constructive needs of his mental life.”

Maria Montessori
(The Secret of Childhood
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We’re all guilty of it. We spend hundreds of dollars on fancy strollers to make our life easier when our children are small. But are we really meeting the needs of our children by doing this? There will always be times that we must put the safety of our children ahead of their own desires. But do we honestly take the opportunities when they arise to allow our children to walk on their own, at their own pace, and explore the world around them?  Are we overusing strollers and turning our children in to “fine fruit”?  It’s most definitely something to think about.

What are “Sensitive Periods”?

What are “Sensitive Periods”?

Montessori theory talks a lot about ‘sensitive periods‘ and how the child is guided by inner forces that shape their developmental needs. Children pass through sensitive periods for language, movement, order, writing, reading, etc.

It is during these sensitive periods that there is a great need for total focus, sensorial exploration, and a need for repeating activities in order to master skills. Sometimes these sensitive periods are characterized by overpowering (sometimes obsessive) and intense activity.

Interrupting a child while they are in the middle of an intense sensitive period can result in a powerful emotional response (i.e. tantrum). Break a routine that a child is attempting to…Read the full article.

The Eight Principles of Montessori Education

The Eight Principles of Montessori Education

Montessori is not just about Montessori materials … it’s a way of life. It’s about who you are, how you think, and what you feel. It’s about allowing yourself to think freely, to love learning, to solve problems, to care for and respect others, to value the Earth.
Even if you’re not offering your children a pure Montessori environment filled with Montessori materials, it’s important to understand the Montessori Principles. The following 8 principles can be applied to your life and home.

  1. Movement and cognition are closely entwined, and movement can enhance thinking and learning.
  2. Learning and well-being are improved when people… Read More

 

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